The Cellars Wines & Spirits Good Taste Should Cost Less Roseville wine bottle wine in glass beer in glass
Now on Sale
Events & Seminars
Join Our Mailing List
Ask The Cellars
Brews Tribune News
Eagan
Plymouth
Woodbury
White Bear Lake
Home About The Cellars Locations & Contacts News & Links

 

Search

Archive

April 2008
M T W T F S S
« Mar   May »
 123456
78910111213
14151617181920
21222324252627
282930  

Categories

Meta

  • Popular Tags

  • Gewürztraminer

    Dear Mrs. Bryce,

    I was pleased to hear that you enjoyed the Riesling that you picked up last week.  I thought that it would be a nice transitional wine for moving into white wines from the blush wines you have had in the past.  I recalled that you were talking about making a spicy Asian recipe.  Spicy foods can have a tendency to bowl over many wines so pairing a wine that is also somewhat spicy compliments the dish quite nicely.  I’d like to recommend a Gewürztraminer (pronounced ‘ga-VERTZ-trah-MEE-ner’) as it works well with “hot” spiced foods.  The grape is originally from Germany, but now there are plantings in the U.S., Australia, France, and other countries.  The word actually means “spice grapes”.  Now that you have experienced a Riesling, this will be similar in sweetness but a little more zestful and lively and of course carries a tanginess of spice.  There are often lychee and melon aromatics.   I often find pear, honeydew melon, honeyed apricots & peach flavors in many that I come across.  Some of the best come from the Alsace region of France and they tend to drink a little drier than their American cousins.  Gewürztraminers will work very favorably with Thai, Indian (especially curry dishes), Szechuan and Mexican fare such as enchiladas in a white cream sauce with green chilies.  It is a delightful sipping wine so it doesn’t have to go with a meal at all.  A very solid “Gavertz” that is perennially a best seller is the Fetzer Vineyards.  We have been selling a tremendous amount of the Macher Gewurztraminer Spatlese from Germany as well.  The ideal drinking temperature is about 45 degrees so consider putting it in the refrigerator for eight hours and then pulling it out about a half hour before serving.  I think this would be the perfect pairing for your dinner plans

    Rod Olson
    The Cellars Wines & Spirits